Code a game comp - The Great Christmas Adventure - Nov 4th to Dec 23rd

Discussions related to graphics (2D and 3D), animation and games programming
Patrick M
Posts: 99
Joined: Mon 02 Apr 2018, 21:51

Re: Code a game comp - The Great Christmas Adventure - Nov 4th to Dec 23rd

Post by Patrick M » Wed 05 Dec 2018, 17:36

David Williams wrote:
Wed 05 Dec 2018, 16:00
Anyway, what's with the holly? You need it to pop the balloon
In real life you could easily pop the balloon by squeezing it until it bursts.
P.M.

David Williams
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed 04 Jul 2018, 16:23

Re: Code a game comp - The Great Christmas Adventure - Nov 4th to Dec 23rd

Post by David Williams » Wed 05 Dec 2018, 18:30

Patrick M wrote:
Wed 05 Dec 2018, 17:36
David Williams wrote:
Wed 05 Dec 2018, 16:00
Anyway, what's with the holly? You need it to pop the balloon
In real life you could easily pop the balloon by squeezing it until it bursts.
This one's a magical balloon. It doesn't obey the laws of nature as we understand them. :)

guest
Posts: 227
Joined: Mon 02 Apr 2018, 09:12

Re: Code a game comp - The Great Christmas Adventure - Nov 4th to Dec 23rd

Post by guest » Wed 05 Dec 2018, 23:44

David Williams wrote:
Wed 05 Dec 2018, 16:00
I don't yet know how to make the leaves' tips more pointed or needle-like
I admire your persistence with Blender, and it's a skill that will no doubt be of great value, but I would definitely have paid $15 for these (apparently quite pointy) commercially available holly leaves.

One issue I've encountered with downloaded models is that you have no control over the scale, so they may be drastically out of proportion compared with other 3D objects in your scene. I made a version of OBJ2FVF with a scaling factor built in to address that.

David Williams
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Joined: Wed 04 Jul 2018, 16:23

Re: Code a game comp - The Great Christmas Adventure - Nov 4th to Dec 23rd

Post by David Williams » Thu 06 Dec 2018, 10:02

guest wrote:
Wed 05 Dec 2018, 23:44
David Williams wrote:
Wed 05 Dec 2018, 16:00
I don't yet know how to make the leaves' tips more pointed or needle-like
I admire your persistence with Blender, and it's a skill that will no doubt be of great value, but I would definitely have paid $15 for these (apparently quite pointy) commercially available holly leaves
It's a vast improvement of course over my seemingly hybrid holly-oak leaf, but it won't make the actual game any better other than aesthetically. Also, I'm not using real-time illumination (no light sources), with one result being that the commercial holly object which looks so nice on the website won't be done justice by my program!

One issue I've encountered with downloaded models is that you have no control over the scale, so they may be drastically out of proportion compared with other 3D objects in your scene. I made a version of OBJ2FVF with a scaling factor built in to address that.
Notwithstanding the decreasing probability of the project being completed by the deadline, I wouldn't mind a copy of that version of OBJ2FVF if I may, in case I do have to resort to buying off-the-shelf assets (I'm not too proud to do so).


David.
--

guest
Posts: 227
Joined: Mon 02 Apr 2018, 09:12

Re: Code a game comp - The Great Christmas Adventure - Nov 4th to Dec 23rd

Post by guest » Thu 06 Dec 2018, 10:51

David Williams wrote:
Thu 06 Dec 2018, 10:02
I'm not using real-time illumination (no light sources)
A hint from my own experience is to locate a single light source at the position of the eye/camera. It's not physically realistic of course, but it can give a more interesting and varied effect than the entirely 'flat' illumination resulting from having no light source at all. That's what 'brandenburg.bbc' does.
I wouldn't mind a copy of that version of OBJ2FVF if I may
It was an ad-hoc modification, I didn't save it. I'm pretty sure that all I did was to multiply the x, y and z coordinates on output by a constant scaling factor, so trivial to reproduce.

As you can tell from the fact that the source filename is hard coded in the program, OBJ2FVF has never been worked up into a proper utility. It would obviously be desirable to do so, but there's just no incentive. If somebody else is inclined to take on the task, other useful options might be translation and/or rotation of the model, addition of constant RGB values to the vertices if the source file doesn't have them (needed for rendering with lighting in BB4W) and pruning/selection of parts of the model if they are individually identified in the source file.

michael
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Joined: Mon 02 Apr 2018, 17:13

Re: Code a game comp - The Great Christmas Adventure - Nov 4th to Dec 23rd

Post by michael » Fri 07 Dec 2018, 02:56

That red balloon in the video took about 4 hours to model and texture in Blender!
I have seen many Blender videos. I have tried Blender in the past and it is quite the tool. I also tried and bought Hexagon 3D. I am surprised you have become skilled in Blender so quickly.

David Williams
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed 04 Jul 2018, 16:23

Re: Code a game comp - The Great Christmas Adventure - Nov 4th to Dec 23rd

Post by David Williams » Fri 07 Dec 2018, 16:18

michael wrote:
Fri 07 Dec 2018, 02:56
That red balloon in the video took about 4 hours to model and texture in Blender!
I have seen many Blender videos. I have tried Blender in the past and it is quite the tool. I also tried and bought Hexagon 3D. I am surprised you have become skilled in Blender so quickly.
Not skilled, but calmly sledgehammering my way along. Still don't know how to model spikey holly leaves :D

(I think it just involves learning how to use Blender's Bézier tool properly)

Blender is an absolutely amazing piece of (free) software which I had been meaning to learn for years (since 2011, I think). I finally got around to it about er... 5 weeks ago?

I started here with Andrew Price's dougnut tutorial (which I still couldn't right after watching the series twice -- not his fault, though):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYj6e-72RDs

Then I followed the first two dozen-or-so tutorials from BornCG:
https://youtu.be/lY6KPrc4uMw


David.
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mikeg
Posts: 32
Joined: Sat 23 Jun 2018, 19:52

Re: Code a game comp - The Great Christmas Adventure - Nov 4th to Dec 23rd

Post by mikeg » Sat 08 Dec 2018, 01:17

software which I had been meaning to learn for years (since 2011, I think)


Thats around the same time I first looked at BBC Basic, but at the time, didnt realize it was the platform I was looking for. So I wasted years on other basic platforms until I met Richard and he introduced me to LBB then I looked at BBC Basic. Blender was free and I should have learned it instead of Hexagon 3D, but Richard did make a OBJ converter and I was able to convert the files, but didnt spend a lot of time on it. Shoulda woulda coulda... At least you have clearified that blender is a proper 3D tool for BBC Basic.


I know its pointless to wish, but I wish I had BBC Basic back in 1982... I would have continued with it up to this day. I had made so many utilities on other languages, but then I would have had to had the same computers you had in the UK (acorn) in order to have stayed with it. My biggest issue was Qbasic and its line of languages cost me nothing but money.. I spent $200 on Visual basic.net,and over $200 on Turbo Pascal 6 & 7and well other unmentionables, only to be left high and dry years later.. Thanks to Bill. (Turbo pascal is not basic.. but meh! It is extinct)
It drives me to drink heavily. :(

guest
Posts: 227
Joined: Mon 02 Apr 2018, 09:12

Re: Code a game comp - The Great Christmas Adventure - Nov 4th to Dec 23rd

Post by guest » Sat 08 Dec 2018, 10:02

mikeg wrote:
Sat 08 Dec 2018, 01:17
I would have had to had the same computers you had in the UK (acorn)
[off topic]
Yes, the US model of the BBC Microcomputer bombed (too expensive, and compatibility with the UK model was too poor). Where Acorn and the BBC went wrong was in assuming that the US model had to be able to use an ordinary TV as its monitor in the same way as the European model did. Because of the different (NTSC) TV system, that forced an incompatible change to the screen modes, and in turn that meant that none of the games and other BBC Micro applications would run.

With hindsight, we should have realised that compatibility was essential for the machine to be a success, and that therefore it would have had to be used with a dedicated monitor rather than a TV. But I think there would have been more acceptance of that in the States and Canada, and with it already being an expensive computer the additional cost of a monitor might not have been so significant. As it is, neither the BBC Micro nor BBC BASIC are well known in the US even today.
[/off topic]

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